Tag Archives: sustainable

Stitch Fix #3 – A Farewell Message

I received my third and final Stitch Fix “Fix” and I don’t think I’ll receive a fourth. It seems that the usefulness of using Stitch Fix has a lot to do with your lifestyle. If you are s busy mom that never has time to even glance in the direction of a clothing store to shop for yourself, Stitch Fix might be a huge aide to your hectic world. For me, it was a fun but unnecessary service that definitely was not a need in my life.

If you scroll back to my first post about Stitch Fix you’ll find a long rant about the appeal of Sustainable Fashion. It seems just bad luck for the Stitch Fix brand that I happened to find the Slow Fashion movement the exact same week that I found Stitch Fix. Unfortunately Stitch Fix does not offer (as far as I could tell) any sustainable brands. They do offer a few Made in USA items, but that’s about it. Furthermore Stitch Fix has its own brands (41 Hawthorne, Kut from Kloth, etc) which might be adding to the fast fashion issue.

Despite having these opinions, I decided to order a third fix, mostly because my friend Theresa had signed up and I had a $25 credit to use. Let’s see what they sent.

Item 1: Hanko Buffalo Plaid Vest – Pixley – $58Stitch Fix #3 - 1

This item is probably an easy “yes” for most consumers but I’m just not a fan of vests. My arms get cold!

Item 2: Dean Skinny Jean – Just Black – $78Stitch Fix #3 - 2

I liked the color and style of these pants, and I did specifically ask for colored skinny jeans, but unfortunately to justify adding them to my limited capsule wardrobe they needed to be one size larger.

Item 3: Joana Turtle Neck Pullover Sweater – RD Style – $98Stitch Fix #3 - 3

I would have kept this sweater if the neck had been anything but a cowl. I already have a cowl sweater in my Fall and Winter capsules, and keeping with the “fewer better things” lifestyle I can’t justify buying another one, especially from a non sustainable brand.

Item 4: Londyn Knit Peacoat Jacket – 41Hawthorn – $68Stitch Fix #3 - 4

This coat is a Stitch Fix brand and the fabric quality was terrible. It was not warm enough to be called a “peacoat”. Honestly this garment pisses me off and is the epitome of fast fashion in my opinion.

Item 5: Vance Henley Blouse – 41Hawhorne – $68Stitch Fix #3 - 5

The good news: I asked for a colored blouse and I got one. The bad news: I gave color examples that are appropriate for winter, such as emerald or burgundy, and instead got cobalt blue. I already own a blouse almost identical to this and it’s in my summer capsule where it belongs. Oh and did I mention IT HAD A STAIN!!!
I was pleased by the packaging on Fix #3. I also had the same stylist as Fix #2 which made me happy. I think unfortunately that the stylist got my style wrong. Although I do like conservative clothing due to my professional workplace setting, I still want to look my age: 28. Often times the teams she’d send were things that I could see my mom wearing more so than myself.

And with that I say so long and fair well Stitch Fix. You were fun for a little while but ultimately not a service that fits with my lifestyle.

Stitch Fix #2 and Thoughts from Friends on their Fixes

Just as the first, my secondIMG_1594 Stitch Fix arrived right on time in a beautifully wrapped package gleaming with promise and excitement. I had asked my stylist for a specific item this time around; a pair of mid-rise skinny jeans.
Here are the items I received in my second Fix:

Item 1:   Kamile Jersey Ruched Detail Dress – Gilli – $54

This item fit well, but I felt like it was too dowdy. This is the second time I’ve received a dress from Stitch Fix and felt like it was “too old” for my taste.

Item 2:   Mariska Side Split Knit Top – RD Style – $48

This item is a tunic sweater with long slits up either side. I loved the fabric and color, but the fit was slightly too slouchy for me.

Item 3:   Edgewater Knit Top – Loveappella – $48

This shirt was soft and fit well, but the price seemed high for a casual 3/4 sleeve cotton tee.

Item 4:   Dayna Skinny Jean – Kut From Kloth – $88

Mid-rise black skinny jeans, just like I asked for! Well, almost. See more below!

Item 5:   Marvin Jacket – Sanctuary – $138

This was the WORST item of this fix. It’s an outerwear coat that’s straight cut. The fabric was cotton, so not even close to being weatherproof. The collar and sleeves looked like the same style as on letter man jackets. Weird… The lack of a lapel also seemed odd to me. This was a total stitch fix fail.

What did I keep?

Well, although I was hoping for skinny BLUE jeans, I fell in love with the Kut from Kloth black skinny jeans that I received in my fix. I’ve been wearing them for over a month now (no not every single day…) and they are wonderful. Definitely mid-rise like I asked and the fit is perfect. The fabric feels thick which is how I like my skinnys.

Being silly modeling off my new black skinny jeans and 3/4 sleeve tee from Stitch Fix.
Being silly modeling off my new black skinny jeans and 3/4 sleeve tee from Stitch Fix.

I also kept Item #3. I hemmed and hawed on this item for the entire 3 days until my return package was due back in the mail. The shirt fits great and is super soft, but I was hesitant that it’s not special enough to warrant A) the $45 price and B) a coveted spot in my fall capsule (See Capsule Wardrobe: Narrowing Down the Options). In the end I kept it.

To recap, I kept 1 item from my first Stitch Fix and two items from my second. I’ll receive at least one more “Fix” before deciding whether or not to continue this service. Stay posted!

If you’d like to try Stitch Fix, click here!

 

A note from Kimberly:

“A few weeks ago I received my second Stitch Fix and was shocked with what I found. Normally each box is nicely packaged. All of the clothes are neatly folded and wrapped in a piece of tissue paper with a little Stitch Fix label. My last box was completely disheveled. It literally looked like the person who packaged it tried on the items and then threw them into the box. One of the shirts was even inside out!

–> Kimberly contacted Stitch Fix and let them know about the issue and her third box came with an apology note from her new stylist. Obviously no company wants to be represented in this way, but sometimes employees are disgruntled. If you ever have an experience similar to Kimberly’s post a message below. I’m curious to see just how often this happens.

Stitch Fix #1 and a Message About Our Consumer Nation

The purpose of this post is two-fold: 1) To continue my journey into a life of “Fewer, Better Things”* and 2) To review my experience with the company Stitch Fix.

*The motto I’ve adopted from the amazingly socially reliable company Cuyana

I recently watched a movie on Netflix called The True Cost. The True Cost is a documentary uncovering the truth about the wasteful and harmful nature of the fashion industry. The “Fast Fashion” industry is the #2 polluting industry globally, second only to petroleum.

If you’re not convinced yet that buying 50 things on Black Friday is directly impacting our world in a very serious way, here are a few statistics that might pique your interest in learning more:

  • Fashion’s engine is powered by an estimated 40 million garment workers, most of whom make less than $1 per day.
  • The average American disposes of 80 lbs of clothing each year.
  • Fast fashion clothes are full of toxin chemicals including LEAD! (read more here)
  • Cotton farming is responsible for 2.6% of the world’s water use.
  • An estimated 17 to 20% of industrial water pollution comes from textile dyeing and treatment and an estimated 8,000 synthetic chemicals are used throughout the world to turn raw materials into textiles. 

So what does all of this pollution and inhumane labor get us? A closet full of cheap clothes and pockets stuffed full of cash for the few fashion executives. So is it worth it? As part of my journey into defining and wearing a Capsule Wardrobe I cut down extremely on my fashion purchases. The first item that I bought was an amazing tote bag from a wonderfully sustainable company, Cuyana. I never realized that spending $160 on one bag could feel so good, but knowing that I put my money where my mouth is when it comes to buying clothing from responsible companies was outstanding.

Check out this list of companies that have been rated among the top by EthicalConsumer.com.

Links to a few of my favorite sustainable brands:

Now let’s talk about Stitch Fix

Stitch Fix #1 (8/5/15)Here it is in all it’s glory! If you haven’t heard of Stitch Fix and want to learn more, check it out here.

Prior to scheduling this fix, I filled out the lengthy style guide (which was very fun). I even included a specific note to my stylist regarding what I wanted to see in my first fix. I specifically asked for a black blaze, and not to include pants, shorts, or skirts. Not only did my stylist, Amber, follow the instructions to a T, she also included a My note from Amber, the stylistlovely message regarding the items she chose and why. I created a Pinterest board filled with fashion pins to help Amber understand my style. I highly recommend doing this. Amber even mentioned in her note that it was helpful 🙂Style Cards

The fix also comes with a “style card” for each item which shows you how to mix and match it with items in your closet to have a stylish put together look. So let’s take a look at the items I received.

Fix #1: My First 5 ItemsItem 1) Adrianna Circle Bib Necklace, by Zad, $34.00

Item 2) Dita Sleeveless Ponte Dress, by 41Hawthorne, $68.00

Item 3) Corinna Striped Dolman Top, by Market & Spruce, $48.00

Item 4) Kaylie Solid French Terry Blazer, by Tart, $128.00

Item 5) Liffey Button Down Top, by Skies are Blue, $58.00

After trying all of the pieces on, and mixing and matching with items in my summer capsule, I decided to only keep one thing; Item 3. I was also very close to keeping Item 2, and probably would of if it had been a brighter color.

I was also disappointed that 3 of the 5 pieces were Stitch Fix specific brands (41Hawthorne, Market & Spruce, Skies are Blue); meaning not something you can buy somewhere else. This wouldn’t bother me if they had a sustainability or eco-friendly statement on their website about their brands, but until I see that it makes me like this a tad less, but I still want to try it a few more times. This method of having handpicked items delivered to me should compliment the Capsule Wardrobe lifestyle well. It’s especially useful since I live in a smaller town without access to non “big box” clothing stores.

Pros: Everything fit, I’d score this a 7/10 for my style (not bad for the first try), a few items were very nice quality

Cons: Next time I will specify no jewelry, does not offer sustainable brands (that I’m aware of)

My take home message:

Stitch Fix, please add some sustainable brands to your lineup. I’d happily pay $30 more per item if I knew they came from companies dedicated to ending the “fast fashion” epidemic.

Zady Brand Manifesto
Zady Brand Manifesto